Demonstrated Interest

The College Put Me on the Wait List. What Does that Mean? What Should I Do?

cropped-gold-boy-in-grad-cap.jpgI attended an outstanding webinar today hosted by Cyndy McDonald of Guided Path and delivered by  Peter Van Buskirk  of Best College Fit . Peter shared many valuable insights into the college admissions process from the perspective of the school’s enrollment management and yield. Peter Van Buskirk holds a wealth of knowledge.  I encourage you to visit his website BestCollegeFit to see when he presenting at an event in your area. Below are some key points Peter shared about Wait Lists.

  • The Wait List is a DEFINITE MAYBE  NOT a POLITE DENIAL.
  • Many schools use the wait list as a means to improve the yield that they report for rankings.
  • You are still in the game, but you need to continue to play your best.

If you are truly interested in a school that puts you on its Wait List:

  • Act NOW.  Don’t wait.  Some schools go to the wait list as early as mid April.
  • Get on the radar screen of your regional recruiter.
  • Visit the campus.  Yes, AGAIN if you have already been there and be sure the admissions office knows you made the visit.
  • Clarify your need for financial aid.  If you have figured out a way to pay for the college without financial aid, let the college know this in writing.  Money matters when it comes to the wait list.
  • If you make it off the wait list, he school will most likely call you and ask you if you would like the spot.
  • Be ready because you most likely have only 24-48 hours to respond.  Your official offer won’t arrive until you verbally accept the spot.

Most importantly, remember, the best college for you is the one that fits YOU best.  Don’t be swayed by glitzy advertising and don’t let a college’s decision shape your opinion of yourself.

Best,

Sandy Aprahamian, Principal, EDNavigators, Independent Educational Consultant

Two Terms You NEED to Know Before You Apply to College

Yield and Demonstrated Interest What is yield in college admissions? Yield is an important term for college applicants and their parents to understand. A college's yield is the percentage of students who decide to attend a college in relation to the number of students to whom that college offers admission. This number is important because colleges are ranked and judged by their yield.

It is not in a college's best business interest to accept a student who will eventually deny its offer. Overqualified students and students who have not demonstrated interest fit this category.  Yes, overqualified students do get rejection letters.  Students who do not demonstrate interest in the college also get rejection letters.

What is demonstrated interest?  Demonstrated interest is the interest a student shows in a school through visits, calls, emails, social media etc.  If a college sends an email and you are interested in that school, open the email and click a link in it.  Colleges can and do track this.  If the college has a Facebook and/or Twitter account, follow it.  This article tells the true story of how colleges can track your online activity.  Visit and initiate contact with schools that interest you.  They are tracking your interest.

College is a business. Stay strong and confident. Demonstrate interest.    A deferral or rejection does NOT always mean you are not a strong or qualified applicant.

Related Articles:

Colleges intensify recruitment through use of "Big Data" , Nancy Griesemer - DC College Admissions Examiner, January 2014

Is it better to get a B in a difficult class or an A in an easier class?, EdNavigators

The Rejection Letter:  Keep Perspective, EdNavigators

Is it better to get a B in a difficult class or an A in an easier class?

This list from the Independent Educational Consultant Association answers this and other questions about what strengths and experiences colleges are looking for in high school students. Screen Shot 2013-10-11 at 9.53.42 AM

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