Early Decision

Some October 2014 SAT Scores are Delayed

Screen Shot 2014-07-11 at 9.03.23 PMSome high school students recently learned that the reporting of their October SAT scores is being delayed.  This Washington Post article provides an overview of the situation.  With many Early Action and Early Decision deadlines only three days away, seniors who were counting on these scores to complete their application may not make the application deadlines.  The score delays affect students who took the SAT in China, South Korea and, possibly Singapore.  Students who find themselves in this situation should call or email each school directly to ask how the delay will be handled.  Some colleges will give a grace period due to the circumstances - some will not.  This is frustrating all-around.  At EDNaviagotors  we encourage students to complete their testing by the end of their junior year of high school.  For high school seniors, this removes the testing burden, the uncertainty of where test scores will fall and whether or not scores will arrive in time.  High school seniors are busy enough focusing on grades, essays and applications in the fall.

Sandy Aprahamian, EDNavigators

Another College Application Question With Varying Answers

Screen Shot 2014-06-19 at 11.24.14 AMRising Seniors are encouraged to begin their college applications over the summer between Junior and Senior Year.  This sounds like a simple task, but considering that colleges work with different applications and on different timelines, it gets complicated quickly.  The first question students must find the answer to is:

When Do College Applications Go Live?

For schools that accept the Common Application and the Universal Application, these dates apply:

  • The Universal Application opens on July 1, 2014
  • The Common Application opens on August 1, 2014

At some schools, like The University of Chicago, you can start and submit your supplement before you complete the Universal or Common App.

Some schools with rolling admission, like Delaware Valley College, accept applications anytime after the student completes his/her junior year of high school. Others with rolling admission, like Pennsylvania State University make the application available September 1.

Bottom Line:

Check the website or call each school to which you plan to apply to get its specific application timeline.

Use a system to keep track of what is due when.

If you are planning to apply to colleges that accept the Universal Application or Common Application, start the main essay as soon as you can and supplemental essays (common app prompts are here) as soon as they are released by the school.  Early Decision/Early Action Dates of Nov. 1 and Nov 15 come quickly.

Sandy Aprahamian, EDNavigators LLC

 

 

The SAT is tomorrow and I have the flu! What should I do?

fluWinter is a popular time for high school juniors to take the SAT.  It is also, unfortunately, flu season. If you have the flu and are scheduled to take the SAT tomorrow, don’t panic.  Your health is most important.  There is still time.

In an ideal world, you planned your testing timeline in advance and gave yourself some room “just in case” this were to happen.  If you didn’t plan out your testing timeline, do it now.

Screen Shot 2013-12-02 at 10.23.14 AMAssuming you plan to take SAT Subject Tests and AP exams, your new testing timeline can be as follows:

  • SAT March 8
  • SAT Subject Tests May 3 and June 7

Since not all subjects are offered on both dates, it is important to

1.  Check when the tests you want to take are offered and

2.  Leave May and June test dates open for SAT Subject Tests.

***You may take up to three subject tests in one day

Retesting option is  October 11 and maybe November 8 and December 6 depending upon the college deadlines and whether or not you are applying Early Decision or Early Action.  All colleges have different application deadlines.

**SAT and the SAT Subject Tests can't be taken on the same day

Note:  AP Exams are May 5-16.  These are given during school hours so they will not conflict with the SAT or SAT Subject Tests in scheduling.  It’s just important to be aware that they will be given during this timeframe.

If you do have the flu and need to reschedule your SAT:

  • Log in to your College Board account and request a new test date.  The College Board directions are here.
  • There is a $27 change fee.
  • Colleges do NOT see that this change was made.
  • They will simply see the date you actually take the test and the scores you receive.
  • Don’t worry about the change- just work on feeling better.

I do not recommend taking a standardized test when you are ill because you will not be presenting yourself at your optimal strength.  If, however, you are only slightly under the weather or just want to skip the test because you want more time to prepare or you don’t want to get up early, I recommend you get up and take tomorrow’s test.  If you don’t like your score, don’t report it and take the test again on a later date.  At least you got one test under your belt.

Before rescheduling, create a calendar and make sure you have time to make-up the test.

2014 Testing Dates:

2014 SAT Tests are  January 25, March 8, May 3, June 7, October 11, November 8, December 6,

2014 SAT Subject Tests are offered  every SAT testing date except March

2014 AP Exams are May 5th-16th

Sandy Aprahamian, Owner, Educational Consultant, EdNavigators

 

The Rejection Letter - Keep Perspective

Rejection letters ... I desperately wish I could ease the pain of rejection that some seniors are feeling after receiving their Early Action/Early Decision letters.

Seniors, a letter of rejection from a college is NOT a rejection of you as a person. Colleges are looking to craft a class with a specific make-up of students.  This changes annually and no one but the college decision-makers themselves know the ingredients they desire for their freshman class.
You may very well outshine some of the students that were accepted, but those students may have a specific characteristic, demographic, skill, talent or quality that the school needs or desires for their class. That does not mean your strengths are worthless. Very often, there is NO specific reason for a denial other than too many qualified candidates.
It's hard to see the big picture when you in the middle of it.
  • Perhaps the college was not the best fit for you.
  • Perhaps the admissions officers were able to see something you were blinded to in the frenzy of completing the application requirements.
  • Perhaps the college sees that you are at risk of struggling financially or not receiving the aid you will need to graduate. The college may have actually done you a favor in the long run by sending you a rejection letter.
  • Most likely, there is no specific rhyme or reason as to why you were not accepted.
You will never know the rationale behind the college or university's decision.  You DO need to know, however, that you have plenty of outstanding options.
Keep perspective. I am a firm believer that things happen for a reason and that things do work out.  It's normal to feel sad, angry, disappointed, or defeated. Feel your feelings then move on.
Grieve briefly if you need to then move forward with confidence. Decide not to dwell.
It's a big world with many opportunities and many paths available to reach a goal. Do NOT be critical if yourself if a rejection letter arrives. Think bigger. Think different.  Envision, plan and navigate a new route. An exciting future awaits.
Sandy Aprahamian, EdNavigators
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