Revised SAT

Ten Valuable Take-Aways from The HECA Conference in Philadelphia June 2016

I met many knowledgeable and caring professionals including other IECs (Independent Educational Consultants), college presidents, college admissions representatives, vendors and authors at the HECA conference in Philadelphia last week.  I toured eight college campuses, attended nine workshops and listened to leaders in the field speak about college admissions, Liberal Arts Colleges, the current and future state of higher education and the Coalition for Access and Admission in Higher Education. The conference was extremely valuable and information rich. These ten valuable take-aways offer only a glimpse of what was offered.

Ten Valuable Take-Aways from the HECA conference in Philadelphia June 2016

(- not all new information, but information that I feel is valuable for my students and families to know)

  1. Checking the box indicating that you are applying for financial aid in the college application can cause your application to be considered incomplete to the college until all financial firms are submitted.
  2. It is important that after registering for any future SAT test, students check the email associated with their College Board account. The College Board implemented a new plan in June 2016. Selected students who register for the test will receive an email stating that they are required to submit a Verification Form by a given deadline. If the form is not submitted by this deadline, College Board will cancel the student’s registration and credit the registration fee back to the credit card. Avoid the surprise of showing up for the SAT only to find that you are not actually registered.  Students MUST check their email often.
  3. There are three different routes to the military: Service Academies, ROTC (Reserve Officers Training Corps) and OCS (Officer Candidate School)  Each path has different requirements
  4. There is a company called New Frontiers in Learning that is full of trained professionals to help students with learning difficulties navigate the transition to college and learn to self advocate.
  5. HECA members as a whole are dedicated, collaborative, extremely caring and knowledgeable professionals in the field of college consulting.
  6. Liberal arts students are in demand: CIC Website For higher ed professionals - LiberalArtsPower For students and parents-  LiberalArtsLife Can you see yourself in this environment- @smartcolleges twitterfeed
  7. Purpose fuels GRIT and experiencing failure is essential to building resiliency
  8. Colleges want to admit students who will succeed there. If there is a concern about that, some colleges give the student a chance to try it out before committing. (Passport Program- St Joseph's University)
  9. Colleges and Universities have priorities in building their class each year. Their goal is to build a community of students who will help the university continue on its mission.
  10. Each college/university has special qualities just as each student does. The staff and faculty at those colleges really want their students to take advantage of all the school has to offer.
  • A pre-med student really can actively pursue the arts in college as well. Muhlenberg College, Swarthmore College
  • A women's college can be made as coed as the student desires it to be.
  • Traditions are strong on most campuses (Bryn Mawr /Haverford/ Lehigh/Lafayette)
  • Engineering and business can be combined. (Lehigh IBE, Villanova SBI)
  • Pass fail evaluations require exceptional knowledge of a given subject and/or field. (Swarthmore College Honors Program)
  • Intellectual curiosity is very important - Haverford College
  • Jesuit colleges have the mission of developing students of giving character with a strong appreciation of differences. (Villanova University, Saint Josephs University)
  • Not every arts focused student needs to present a portfolio for admission. For schools that do require it, specific types of art are required and the admissions staff is there to help students through the process. (Muhlenberg College, Tyler School of Art at Temple University, University of the Arts in Philadelphia)
  • There are colleges who aim to provide both admission decisions and financial aid awards to early admission applicants by December 20. (Drew University)
  • Sandy Aprahamian, EDNavigators LLC

     

    Interpreting rSAT Scores

    Screen Shot 2016-05-10 at 5.31.21 PMThe scores for the March SATs (rSAT) were released today.  The College Board released this converter tool to use in converting SAT scores from new to old and from old to new. The conversions indicate that the test has been re-centered.  This means that the new concordance tables are showing the mean score for the rSAT looks to be closer to a 1090.  The mean score for the previous SAT was a 1010.

    A few leaders in the test-prep/college counseling world have created some nice graphics to show the score comparisons between the old SAT, the new SAT and the ACT.

    Comparison and Concordance of the New SAT and ACT, Compass Education Group, Art Sawyer - May 2016

    Higher Ed Data Stories - New SAT Concordance Tables, Jon Boeckenstedt - May 2016

    RE-CENTERING REDUX, Ethical College Admissions, James Jump - May 2016

    PSAT Scores are Back - Tips on Interpreting Scores -

    PSAT scores were released over the past week.  For those students who were able to access them, many are not clear on how to interpret them.

    Most common questions:

    Based on my PSAT results, how will I do on the SAT?

    Official concordance tables have not been released to predict how the 2015 PSAT scores would project to the SAT - A perfect score on the SAT is a 1600. A perfect score on the PSAT is a 1520. The PSAT perfect score is lower because the SAT is more difficult than the PSAT. The PSAT 1520 perfect score is shifted down to account for its differences in difficulty level. While a perfect score on the PSAT suggests you might earn a perfect score on the SAT, this is not certain because the additional questions on the SAT will be more difficult than those that were on the PSAT.  Many in the industry have also noticed somewhat inflated PSAT scores this year.

    Will I qualify for the National Merit Scholarship?

    National Merit Scholarship Qualification is based on your NMSC Selection Index Score.  The selection index score can be found on the third page of your PSAT score report.  The Selection Index Score is calculated by weighting your Writing score ⅔ and your Math score ⅓ - More information about the PSAT/NMSQT can be found in the student guide.

    Official selection index score cut-offs have not yet been determined for the class of 2017, but the predicted scores by state can be found here.

    Should I take the ACT or the SAT?

    Rather than reinvent the wheel, I refer to this article and chart by Compass Prep with the reminder that the most difficult SAT questions were left off the PSAT, the scoring of the March SAT will be delayed and preparation for one test overlaps preparation for the other.

    If I decide to take the SAT, do I need to take it with writing?

    It depends. This link will provide some insight into that.

    Sandy Aprahamian, M.Ed.  EDNavigators LLC

     

    Side By Side Comparison: SAT/Revised SAT/ACT - A Preliminary Look

    The New SAT vs the Current SAT vs the ACT

    A Preliminary Look

    Current SATTotal Time/#Questions Revised SAT - Effective For Class of 2017:(this is based on College Board’s 208 page DRAFT Release of Test Specifications for the Redesigned SAT found here:  https://www.collegeboard.org/delivering-opportunity/sat/redesign  **Some features of the new test, such as timing, length, and scores to be reported, may still be adjusted pending the outcome of CollegeBoard studiesThis new test will "go live" with the PSAT in the Fall of 2015 - until then, the Current SAT will be the only SAT offered.Total Time/#Questions ACT (With ACT update, reporting will change but the test will remain the same) Total Time/ #Questions
    Math 70min./54 Questions (approx 1/3 emphasis on geometry - includes algebra, sequences, permutations does not include  trig) 800 points 80 min/ 57 Questions(1/10 emphasis on geometry - includes trig,  a lot of algebra functions, algebra 2, area of circle, and complex numbers - more word problems with direct application to real-world events) 800 points 60min/60 Questions (pre-algebra, elementary algebra, intermediate algebra, coordinate geometry, plane geometry, and trigonometry)
    Reading 70min/67 Questions (Passage topics are random - includes uncommon vocabulary) 800 points 65 min/52 Questions (Passages will focus on science/history and social science - vocabulary will be tested in context) 400 points 35 min/ 40Questions (Passages broken down into Prose Fiction, Humanities, Social Science and Natural Science)
    Writing 60min/49 Questions (called writing)- revision of sentences 800 points 35 min/44 Questions (called writing and language) - revision of passages/may include tables/charts/graphs - 400 points 45 min/75 Questions (called English) - revision of passages
    Essay 25min/1 prompt score goes into writing score 50 min/ 1 prompt (optional) - graded separately from final math/reading/writing - will test reading and analysis as well as writing 30 min/ 1 prompt (optional)
    Science none (incorporated into reading,writing and math sections) 35 min/ 40 Questions
    Total 225 min (3 hours 45 min)/ 171 Questions 220 min (3 hours 50 min)/153 Questions 205 min/215 Questions
    Penalty for Guessing? yes no no
    Total Possible Points 2400 1600 **big change here in that math will be 800 possible points and reading and writing will be 800 possible points combined - this test places more weight on math than the current SAT - Essay will be scored separately 36
    Scores will be broken down by subject and concept no yes yes (there will be more detail with the new ACT reporting)
    Calculator allowed for entire math section? yes no yes

     

    Key Points -

    • The Revised SAT very similar to the ACT
    • Math will be more heavily weighted on the Revised SAT
    • EDNavigators recommends that the class of 2017 take the current SAT and/or the ACT because there are too many uncertainties about the format of the new SAT as well as the timing of score releases and concordance tables for the new SAT
    • We will continue to share information we get about test changes as soon as they are available

    How to prepare for these tests:

    • READ often
    • Understand math concepts - not just to get a good grade in school, but for yourself - You need to know the concepts after you are tested on them in class. The new SAT puts more weight on Math than the current SAT
    • Put down your calculator!  Practice math without using the calculator.  It won’t be allowed for part of the math section of the SAT
    • There are strategies, but no shortcuts.  Just like anything else in life, success comes from dedication and preparation.

    Sandy Aprahamian, EDNavigators LLC